PERFORMANCE CLASSES

 

BEGINNING ACTING

Theatre Arts 1-2

Course Description: Theatre Arts is the most diverse academic subject because it incorporates every discipline. Students explore pantomime, movement, voice, character development, improvisation, make up, costuming, theatre history, scene study, analysis, technical theatre, and production techniques in various ways. Theatre Arts class will have opportunities to share their progress throughout the year.

Textbook: Theatre: Art in Action © 1999

Classroom Expectations (Show your RIDER pride!):

Respect: Treat fellow students, teachers, and others with respect. THEATRE IS A COLLABORATIVE ART THAT REQUIRES TEAMWORK. Without respect, the classroom team fails. With respect, it flourishes.

Integrity: Push yourself to work hard and cooperate in groups. Put your best work forward and be proud of what you share. THEATRE IS AN ACTIVE PARTICIPATION CLASS. Effort, cooperation, and participation will be rewarded. Attitude and cooperation warrants additional participation in showcases.

Diversity: We are all student-artists from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences. We honor equity, diversity, inclusion, and a sense of belonging where student voice is lifted up and celebrated.

Empowerment: Cooperation in group activities and willingness to share work. Encourage others to share. Give and receive constructive criticism for all to become better artists.

Resolve: Be present and ON TIME daily, ready to learn. Rehearsals are not effective when you are late or absent. Bring supplies to class daily: PENCILS, ERASER, pens, paper, theatre notebook, and any other materials required for each class. Wear clothing that is comfortable and in which you are able to move.

Homework and Grading:
Theatre does require homework! Complete and turn in all assignments on time. No late work can or will be accepted. All work is scored with a point system and/or with rubrics to be distributed in class. Assessments include daily attendance, on task rehearsal, memorization by deadlines, completion of theatre arts notebook, discussion and cooperation, in class performances, and analyses of characters and scenes. Any late work credit, if any, is at the teacher’s discretion. Bonus points can be earned for attending additional crew days or theatre performances.

Attendance Policy:
Since the class does not meet daily, it is imperative and expected that students attend every class, every week. If students are absent, whether excused or unexcused, during any pre-planned performances or tests, students may not be able to retake or makeup the performances or tests. Teacher discretion will be used to determine any credit awarded and makeup options. See RHS attendance policy.

Additional Theatrical Optional Opportunities:
Examples: Productions, Field trips, Participation in Drama Club/Thespians, and more!
Please note: You must attend school at least one half day in order to participate in any after school opportunities. No pass, no play policy applies, too.

 

INTERMEDIATE ACTING

Theatre Arts 3-4

Course Description:
Building from foundation basics learned in Beginning Acting, Intermediate Acting includes more focused acting techniques with character development through short and long form improvisation, scene study, theatre history, continuation of tech theatre, children's theatre, classics and contemporary plays with analysis, non-contact stage combat, musical theatre choreography, and readers’ theatre. Intermediate has performance and competitions built into the curriculum.

Textbook: Theatre: Art in Action © 1999

Resources Available:
Students will have a variety of resources available to help including theatre arts textbooks, theatrical videos, and in class work. Additionally, Mrs. Lane will provide support through training and bringing in guest speakers, offering field trips, and other opportunities.

Classroom Expectations (Show your RIDER pride!):
Respect: Treat fellow students, teachers, and others with respect. THEATRE IS A COLLABORATIVE ART THAT REQUIRES TEAMWORK. Without respect, the classroom team fails. With respect, it flourishes.
Integrity: Push yourself to work hard and cooperate in groups. Put your best work forward and be proud of what you share. THEATRE IS AN ACTIVE PARTICIPATION CLASS. Effort, cooperation, and participation will be rewarded. Attitude and cooperation warrants additional participation in showcases.
Diversity: We are all student-artists from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences. We honor equity, diversity, inclusion, and a sense of belonging where student voice is lifted up and celebrated.
Empowerment: Cooperation in group activities and willingness to share work. Encourage others to share. Give and receive constructive criticism for all to become better artists.

Resolve: Be present and ON TIME daily, ready to learn. Rehearsals are not effective when you are late or absent. Bring supplies to class daily: PENCILS, ERASER, pens, paper, theatre notebook, and any other materials required for each class. Wear clothing that is comfortable and in which you are able to move.


Attendance Policy:
Since the class does not meet daily, it is imperative and expected that students attend every class, every week. If students are absent, whether excused or unexcused, during any pre-planned performances or tests, students may not be able to retake or makeup the performances or tests. Teacher discretion will be used to determine any credit awarded and makeup options. See RHS attendance policy.

Homework and Grading:
Theatre does require homework! Complete and turn in all assignments on time. No late work can or will be accepted. All work is scored with a point system and/or with rubrics to be distributed in class. Assessments include daily attendance, on task rehearsal, memorization by deadlines, completion of theatre arts notebook, discussion and cooperation, in class performances, and analyses of characters and scenes. Any late work credit, if any, is at the teacher’s discretion. Bonus points can be earned for attending additional crew days or theatre performances.

*Required Event:
All students enrolled are required to participate in the event listed below outside of class in order to complete the course and the hours necessary to receive full credit.
• Acting Showcase: Family and friends are invited to the Acting Showcase to see the students perform their audition/competition pieces prior to competition. This is the only opportunity for family and friends to see the audition/competition performances.

Non-participation in required performances will result in a full letter grade drop per event missed. No exceptions. (i.e. That means if you earned an A, but miss showcase, you will receive a B. If you then miss another performance, even in class, you would receive a C.)

Additional Theatrical Opportunities (examples):
• Evening Performances (optional performance opportunities will be announced)
• Field trips (optional trips to community and/or school theatre productions)
• Participation in Drama Club/Thespians (optional club/earned membership)
• Attendance and competition at Oregon Thespian State Conference
• Other Improv Competitions are TBA: Several local organizations are all looking to hire RUCKUS for improv events during the year. Keep that in mind as you plan to attend one event or if you wish to audition to be a permanent member of the Roosevelt Rough Rider RUCKUS teams: Havoc and Brouhaha.
• You must attend school at least one half day in order to participate in any after school opportunities. No pass, no play policy applies, too.

 

ADVANCED ACTING & SENIOR THEATRE

Theatre Arts 5-6 / Theatre Arts 7-8

Course Description:
Students learn the facets of theatre production from playwriting to dramaturgy, characterization to advanced acting techniques for performance. They also will learn acting including dialectical work, directing, technical theatre techniques, advanced monologue and scene analysis, and study theatre history. Students are expected to participate in the Acting Showcase, showcasing Oregon Thespians Northwest Regional Acting, English-Speaking Union Shakespeare and August Wilson Monologue Competitions, and potentially attend State Thespian Conference (*see additional details on separate page).

Textbook and Resources Available: Theatre: Art in Action © 1999 and classroom theatre library


Classroom Expectations (Show your RIDER pride!):

Respect: Treat fellow students, teachers, and others with respect. THEATRE IS A COLLABORATIVE ART THAT REQUIRES TEAMWORK. Without respect, the classroom team fails. With respect, it flourishes.

Integrity: Push yourself to work hard and cooperate in groups. Put your best work forward and be proud of what you share. THEATRE IS AN ACTIVE PARTICIPATION CLASS. Effort, cooperation, and participation will be rewarded. Attitude and cooperation warrants additional participation in showcases.

Diversity: We are all student-artists from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences. We honor equity, diversity, inclusion, and a sense of belonging where student voice is lifted up and celebrated.

Empowerment: Cooperation in group activities and willingness to share work. Encourage others to share. Give and receive constructive criticism for all to become better artists.

Resolve: Be present and ON TIME daily, ready to learn. Rehearsals are not effective when you are late or absent. Bring supplies to class daily: PENCILS, ERASER, pens, paper, theatre notebook, and any other materials required for each class. Wear clothing that is comfortable and in which you are able to move.

Attendance Policy:
Since the class does not meet daily, it is imperative and expected that students attend every class, every week. If students are absent, whether excused or unexcused, during any pre-planned performances or tests, students may not be able to retake or makeup the performances or tests. Teacher discretion will be used to determine any credit awarded and makeup options. See RHS attendance policy.

Homework and Grading:
Theatre does require homework! Complete and turn in all assignments on time. All students will be scored for their performances using the same judging rubrics for Regionals. All work is scored with a point system and/or with rubrics to be distributed in class. Assessments include daily attendance, on task rehearsal, memorization by deadlines, completion of theatre arts notebook, discussion and cooperation, in class performances, and analyses of characters and scenes. No late work can or will be accepted. Any late work credit, if any, is at the teacher’s discretion. Bonus points can be earned for attending additional crew days or theatre performances.

*Required Event:
All students enrolled are required to participate in the event listed below outside of the class in order to complete the course and the hours necessary to receive full credit.
• Acting Showcase: Family and friends are invited to the Acting Showcase to see the students perform their audition/competition pieces prior to competition. This is the only opportunity for family and friends to see the audition/competition performances.

Non-participation in required performances will result in a full letter grade drop per event missed. No exceptions. (i.e. If you earned an A, but miss showcase, you will receive a B. If you then miss another performance, even in class, you’ll have a C and so on.)

Additional Theatrical Opportunities (examples):
• Evening Performances (optional performance opportunities will be announced)
• Field trips (optional trips to community and/or school theatre productions)
• Participation in Drama Club/Thespians (optional club/earned membership)
• Attendance and competition at Oregon Thespian State Conference
Please note: You must attend school at least one half day in order to participate in any after school opportunities. No pass, no play policy applies, too.

 

TH 141: FUNDAMENTALS OF ACTING TECHNIQUES

PCC DUAL CREDIT COURSE

About Dual Credit at PCC

https://www.pcc.edu/prepare/head-start/dual-credit/


Earn College Credit While In High School

Portland Community College provides the opportunity for high school students to earn college credit while still in high school. Students, who complete courses taught at their high school by qualified instructors providing the same rigor and content as an on-campus college class, can earn PCC credit.


3-Step Admission & Registration Instructions

There is a 3-step process for students who wish to receive college credit for their high school course work through PCC Dual Credit:

  1. Apply for admissions

    • Choose PCC High School Dual Credit as your application type.

  2. Log into your MyPCC & set up your permanent password

  3. Register for Dual Credit classes


What's Next?

  1. Check with your high school counselor to find out which classes at your high school are part of the PCC Dual Credit program or visit Participating High Schools.

  2. Before you begin… You must have a personal email address to apply online.

  3. Register for your PCC Dual Credit courses.

Dual Credit classes can help you develop college skills. Please be informed that:

* Dual Credit classes are PCC college classes that are part of your official college transcript.

* College classes, including Dual Credit classes, may impact college GPA, along with scholarship, financial aid, and athletic eligibility.

* You can find out how this course can fulfill requirements at PCC. Visit http://catalog.pcc.edu.

* You can find out how this course can fit at other colleges and universities by contacting their admissions office.

* Find out more in the Dual Credit Student Handbook.

You will need to consider the above information before you sign up for this PCC course. Make sure you do this in time so you don't miss our registration deadline.

Portland Community College

TA 141: Fundamentals of Acting Techniques I

(4 credits / 20 lecture / 40 lecture/lab hours)

Advanced Acting/Senior Theatre

Offered through the PCC Dual Credit Program

SCHOOL YEAR 2021-2022

Class Offered: Yearlong, both Semester 1 & 2


Roosevelt High School

6941 N. Central St.

Portland OR 97203


“A” days, 2nd period, Black Box Theatre, Room 009


Instructor: Jo Strom Lane, jolane@pps.net, 503-916-5260 x82424

Office Location: Storage Room 009C

Office Hours: Flex Days from 2:15-3:15 P.M.

Course website: www.roosevelttheatre.org 

For the most updated syllabi, click on PCC SYLLABI 


COURSE MATERIALS

Text:

  • Poetics by Aristotle

  • Oedipus the King by Sophocles

  • Everyman by Anonymous

  • One of the following: The Taming of the Shrew, Macbeth, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Othello, or Much Ado About Nothing by Shakespeare

  • Tartuffe and/or Les Precieuses Ridicule and/or The Love of Three Oranges by Moliere

  • The Love Suicides at Sonezaki by Chikamatsu

  • The Man Who Turned Into a Dog by Osvaldo Dragun

  • Dead Man’s Cell Phone by Sarah Ruhl

  • The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams

  • Clues to Acting Shakespeare by Wesley Van Tassel

  • Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead by Tom Stoppard

  • Lazzi by Mel Gordon

  • The Viewpoints Book by Anne Bogart and Tina Landau

  • Lessons for the Professional Actor (Michael Chekhov), edited by Deirdre Hurst Du Prey, Performance Art Journal Publications, 1985

  • A Practical Handbook for the Actor, Bruder, Cohn, Olnek, Pollact, Previto and Zigler

  • From Word to Play by Cicely Berry

  • The Stanislavski System by Sonia Moore

  • Respect for Acting by Uta Hagen

  • A History of Theatre by Oscar Brockett

  • Acting One (Most recent edition) by Robert Cohen

  • Backwards and Forwards by David Ball

  • Audition by Michael Shurtleff

  • Viewpoints – Anne Bogart, Tina Landau


Other Required Materials:

  • Notebook with lined paper

  • Pencils with erasers

  • Comfortable clothing in which to move

  • (optional) smart device


COURSE INFORMATION

Course Description: Introduces basic theatrical techniques. Develops text analysis and performance skills. Develops the beginning level awareness of the physical and vocal skills required of a stage performer. Includes reading and analyzing plays to develop acting skills.


Addendum Course Description: Each instructor has a spectrum of foundations for this course, and the CCOG tends to lean toward a text analysis foundation.


*Required Events:

All students enrolled are required to participate in the events listed below outside of the class in order to complete the course and the hours necessary to receive full credit for that semester.

• Fall production: Additional after school rehearsal are required in the weeks prior to evening performances. See separate rehearsal schedule for details.

• Acting Showcase before Regionals: Family and friends are invited to the Acting Showcase to see the students perform their audition/competition pieces prior to the Regional competition. This is the only opportunity for family and friends to see the audition/competition performances.

• Oregon Thespians NW Regional Acting Competition: A per event entry fee is charged for Regionals. Details provided for entry, deadlines, and fees. Scholarships available. Sorry, only competitors and their Theatre Directors are able to attend Regionals.

• Spring production: Senior Shorts senior-directed one-act play festival: Additional after school rehearsal are required prior to evening performances. See separate rehearsal schedule for details.


Non-participation in required performances of the fall one-act and Senior Shorts will result in a full letter grade drop per event missed. No exceptions. (i.e. If you earned an A, but miss one performance of the fall one-act, you will receive a B. If you then miss another performance, you’ll have a C and so on.)


Additional Theatrical Opportunities (examples):

• Evening Performances (optional performance opportunities will be announced)

• Field trips (optional trips to community and/or school theatre productions)

• Participation in Drama Club/Thespians (optional club/earned membership)

• Attendance and competition at Oregon Thespian State Conference

Please note: You must attend school at least one half day in order to participate in any after school opportunities. No pass, no play policy applies, too.


Course Outcomes: The course outcomes can be found at the link below.

https://www.pcc.edu/ccog/ta/141/


Course Prerequisites: A ‘C’ or better in Intermediate Theatre Arts (Theatre 3-4), Advanced Theatre Arts (Theatre 5-6), and/or permission of the instructor. PCC Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.


Attendance Policy/Late Work: Students are expected to attend each class meeting. If a student is absent, it is the student’s responsibility to find out what was covered in class and get the work completed in a timely manner (same number of class days absent plus one additional day). Since the class does not meet daily, it is imperative and expected that students attend every class, every week. If students are absent, whether excused or unexcused, during any pre-planned performances or tests, students may not be able to retake or makeup the performances or tests. No late work can or will be accepted. Any late work credit, if any, is at the teacher’s discretion. Teacher discretion will be used to determine any credit awarded and makeup options. See RHS attendance policy.


Course Grading/Assessment:

Prior to each unit, students will have a pre-assessment of their skills to determine their initial level. Throughout each unit, the student is given the remainder of the classes to work on and develop the skills necessary to offer and demonstrate skill and knowledge of the particular subject. In this performance-based class of such high expectations of learning and demonstration, it is unrealistic and unfair to assume that a student will be able to have “mastered” any one technique. At the end of each unit for the summative assessment, students will need to demonstrate at a “Proficient” level to earn PCC credit. Grading will also be based on the student’s preparedness for class, willingness to participate, cooperation with partners and in ensemble, completed reading and written assignments, quizzes, and of course performance/demonstration of acquired learning.


Grading results in proficiency scale grading of 1-4, with 1 as Immerging, 2 as Sufficient/Working Toward Proficiency, 3 as Proficient, 4 as Highly Proficient/Mastery. The letter grades earned are A – F. All grades will be averaged for a final semester grade of A, B, C, D or F.  It is implied that A = 90-100, B= 80-90, C= 70-80, D= 60-70 and F= 0-60.  


Unit grades will be averaged to provide midterm, quarter and semester grades. Final exams will follow the Roosevelt HS final examination schedule. Note: For PCC Dual Credit grade calculations, students will not be allowed to retake examinations.


Additional course information is available on the “Classes” tab under “Advanced Acting” on the RHS Theatre website. Units listed may be taught in a different order than listed if required.


Unit 1:  Ensemble Building with Improvisation, Voice, and Body Work

Viewpoints – Anne Bogart, Tina Landau

Long-Form Improvisation – Del Close, Keith Johnstone, Instructor Led – vocal and physical warm ups

Read excerpts of Viola Spolin, Paul Sills, Del Close, Keith Johnstone, and/or Charna Halpern

Create Long Form Improv show based on a scenario


Unit 2: Classic Theatre

Read one of the selections from Classic Theatre offered. Click here for lessons.

Lesson 1: Plot Structure

The students will demonstrate their knowledge of plot by participating in a group presentation of plot structure.

Lesson 2: Theme

The students will demonstrate their knowledge of theme by identifying a theme from popular films of their generation.

Lesson 3: Diction

The students will demonstrate their understanding of diction by performing a short scene from “Oedipus” with masks.

Lesson 4: Character

The students will demonstrate their knowledge of characters by completing a “Facebook” profile for a character in a play read in class.

Lesson 5: Music

Students will demonstrate their understanding of music by performing a thirty-second melodrama.

Lesson 6: Spectacle

Students will demonstrate their understanding of spectacle by designing scenery for  “Oedipus”.

Lesson 7: Final Analysis

Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the Six Elements of Drama by analyzing a Greek tragedy in an essay, answering the question “How does the selected play follow Aristotle’s Poetics and would he consider it to be a perfect play?” Also, they will demonstrate their knowledge by writing a mini-Greek tragedy based on a current event and performing it.


Unit 3: Morality Plays and Commedia Dell’Arte

A History of Theatre by Oscar Brockett

Everyman by Anonymous

Scene Work with Lazzi

Lazzi by Mel Gordon

Write an essay comparing one commedia dell’arte character with a modern day example in a situation comedy. Use the physical appearance, mannerisms, and lazzi.


Unit 4: French Neo-Classical Theatre

Read Tartuffe and/or Les Precieuses Ridicule and/or The Love of Three Oranges by Moliere

Discussion of political and social connections to Moliere and his work

Script Scoring as evidence of understanding Moliere scene/monologue and director’s French Scene breakdown

Scene or Monologue Work


Unit 5: Shakespeare Click here for lessons.

Read The Taming of the Shrew, Macbeth, Twelfth Night, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Othello, and/or Much Ado About Nothing by Shakespeare

Clues to Acting Shakespeare by Wesley Van Tassel

(optional) Participation in the English-Speaking Union’s Shakespeare Competition

Lesson 1: Introduction to Shakespeare Performance

Students will be introduced to Shakespeare's works by viewing a parody of his plays.

Lesson 2: Finding the Perfect Shakespeare Piece

Students will demonstrate their understanding of the Acting Shakespeare assignment by selecting a Shakespearean scene or monologue to perform.

Lesson 3: Analyzing Shakespeare's Language

Students will demonstrate their understanding of Shakespearean script analysis by scoring, translating, and analyzing their Shakespeare performance pieces.

Lesson 4: Making Shakespeare Sound Natural

Students will demonstrate their understanding of scansion and phrasing by scoring their Shakespeare performance pieces.

Lesson 5: Creating the Shakespeare Character

Students will demonstrate their understanding of characterization by creating a character with personality and traits for their Shakespearean monologue or scene.

Lesson 6: Blocking Shakespeare

Students will demonstrate their understanding of movement in a performance piece by blocking and providing business for their Shakespearean monologue or scene.

Lesson 7: Shakespeare Previews

Students will demonstrate their knowledge of characterization, blocking, and interpretation by performing a preview of their Shakespeare monologue or scene.

Lesson 8: Shakespeare Polish & Refine

Students will demonstrate their understanding of rehearsing by making and working on one specific acting goal for the Shakespearean monologue or scene.

Lesson 10: Shakespeare Final Performances

Students will demonstrate their understanding of acting Shakespeare by performing their Shakespearean monologue or scene.


Unit 6: Japanese Noh, Kyogen, Kabuki, and Bunraku Theatre

The Love Suicides at Sonezaki by Chikamatsu

Read articles supporting conventions of the five types of Noh Plays, structure and traditions

Perform Bunraku Play.

Students identify the conventions of the Noh form: the five types of Noh plays, the structure of the plays, the order of performance, and the traditional characters; describe and analyze the realization the main character, or shite, achieves at the end of the studied plays; and articulate and discuss at least one element of Japanese culture that the Noh form reveals.

Assessment: Write a one-page analysis of the play using the vocabulary terms for genre, characters, and structure and analyzing the shite's dominant emotion, transformation, and realization.


Unit 7:  Modern Realism

Introduction to Stanislavski, Hagen, and Chekhov and/or other acting technique “greats”

The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams

Lessons for the Professional Actor (Michael Chekhov), edited by Deirdre Hurst Du Prey, Performance Art Journal Publications, 1985

A Practical Handbook for the Actor, Bruder, Cohn, Olnek, Pollact, Previto and Zigler

From Word to Play by Cicely Berry

The Stanislavski System by Sonia Moore

Respect for Acting by Uta Hagen

Acting One (Most recent edition) by Robert Cohen

Backwards and Forwards by David Ball

Audition by Michael Shurtleff


Unit 8: Absurdism

The Man Who Turned Into a Dog by Osvaldo Dragun

Dead Man’s Cell Phone by Sarah Ruhl

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead by Tom Stoppard

Create an ensemble piece with purpose demonstrating absurdism.


Unit 9: Social Justice Theatre and Devised Work

Jerzy Grotowski’s “Towards a Poor Theatre” excerpts

Augusto Boal’s Theatre of the Oppressed

Apply Grotowski and Boal’s theories to Social Awareness Festival (SAFe) and the Social Justice Theatre Project

Write original work. Perform for the public.


Unit 10: Independent Activities

Practice and Critique of all Final Scene and Monologue Work.

All paperwork, research papers, and term papers due by the PCC deadline.

Final Performance and written final.

Due at Final: All research and CRLS work as relates to Senior Portfolio


PCC DUAL CREDIT

This course is offered for Dual Credit through Portland Community College. In addition to earning high school credit for this class, you may register for TA 141: Fundamentals of Acting Techniques through PCC and earn 4 college credits for the course. The PCC credit for this class is offered to you free of charge, for a cost savings of approximately $416 in tuition, $49.80 in fees and $50-$150 in book charges.


If you opt to earn PCC credit for this course, you will become a Portland Community College student. The grade and credits you earn for this course will be posted to your PCC transcript. You are able to access PCC facilities and services as PCC student. You will be assigned a PCC email and ID #, and may obtain a PCC ID card upon request.


Student Rights & Responsibilities:

Students are required to view and comply with the regulations set forth in the PCC Dual Credit Student Handbook. Please request a handbook from your instructor, the Dual Credit office, or download online at:

http://www.pcc.edu/prepare/head-start/dual-credit/documents/student-handbook.pdf


PCC Grading Guidelines can be found at the link below: http://catalog.pcc.edu/handbook/g301-gradingguidelines


Add/Drop/Withdraw deadlines:

http://www.pcc.edu/prepare/head-start/dual-credit/calendar.html


PCC’s Code of Student Conduct:

http://www.pcc.edu/about/policy/student-rights/


Roosevelt High School’s Code of Conduct Policy (via PPS Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook):

https://www.pps.net/cms/lib/OR01913224/Centricity/Domain/51/16-17%20Discipline%20Handbook%20English.pdf


PCC’s Academic Integrity Policy:

http://catalog.pcc.edu/policies/academicintegritypolicy/


Title IX Non-Discrimination Statement:


The high school is responsible for providing access, accommodations, flexibility, and additional/ supplemental services for special populations and protected classes of students.


Portland Community College is committed to creating and fostering a learning and working environment based upon open communication and mutual respect. If you believe you have encountered sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, sexual assault, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, age, national origin, veteran status, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or disability on a PCC campus, please contact the Office of Equity and Inclusion at (971) 722-5840 or equity.inclusion@pcc.edu.


The instructor reserves the right to modify course content and/or substitute assignments and learning activities in response to institutional, weather or class situations.


PCC RESOURCES FOR STUDENTS


Student Resources & Services Index:

Remember, as a PCC Student you have access to many resources! For more information, check out our Student Resource Listing at: http://www.pcc.edu/resources


Student Computing Center (SCC): http://www.pcc.edu/resources/computer-labs/Cascade TEB 125 (971) 722-5440 | Rock Creek Bldg. 2 Room 259 (971) 722-7510

Southeast Library 120 (971) 722-6474 | Sylvania Library 1st Floor (971) 722-4325


The Computing Centers provide internet access and applications such as mathematics computer programs, word processing, desktop publishing, spreadsheets, databases, web page authoring, presentations and programming languages.


Among other services, you have been allocated 100 double-sided pages of free printing for the term, and may use your laptop to print to an available wireless printer. Visit the following address for more information on printing services: http://www.pcc.edu/resources/printing/


Multicultural Center: http://www.pcc.edu/resources/culture/

Cascade Student Union 302 (971) 722-5795 | Rock Creek Bldg. 7 Room 118 (971) 722-7435 | Southeast Mt. Tabor Hall Room 150 (971) 722-6054 | Sylvania CC 267B (971) 722-4112)


Student Learning Centers–Tutoring (SLC): http://www.pcc.edu/resources/tutoring/

Cascade TH 123 (971) 722-5263 | Newberg Center (971) 722-8611 | Rock Creek Bldg. 7 Room 218A (971) 722-7414 | Southeast 1st Floor (971) 722-6470 | Sylvania Southeast Library Room 120 (971) 722-4540


Tutoring availability is campus and term specific. For more information on tutoring schedules, please visit: http://www.pcc.edu/resources/tutoring/.


Free Online Tutoring: go to http://www.pcc.edu/resources/tutoring/etutor/. You will need your MyPCC username and your PCC ID # to log in.


Writing Centers: http://www.pcc.edu/resources/writing/ for a list of campus locations.


PCC Library: http://www.pcc.edu/library/

Cascade Terrell Hall Room 116 (971) 722-5322 | Rock Creek Building 9 2nd Floor (971) 722-7413 | Southeast (971) 722-6187 | Sylvania (971) 722-4935


Access to research databases and borrowing privileges, including books calculators, digital cameras, DVDs, videos, Laptops, music CDs, reserves and Summit materials. PCC participates in the Interlibrary Loan program.


Equal Opportunity Statement: http://www.pcc.edu/about/equity-inclusion/eeo-statement.html


Academic Integrity Statement: http://www.pcc.edu/resources/academic/standards-practices/academic-integrity.html


Instructional ADA Statement:


Dual Credit Students

Federal law requires that high schools provide disability services for students with a documented disability (through either an IEP for 504 accommodation plan), including those students who are taking Dual Credit classes at their high school location.


On-campus students

Students who experience disability related barriers in courses taught on PCC campuses should contact PCC Disability Services at http://www.pcc.edu/resources/disability/. If students elect to use approved academic adjustments, they must provide in advance formal notification from Disability Services to the instructor.